Ginger Supplement Review

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Ginger
  Evaluated for:
Effectiveness Rating Effectiveness Rating
Pregnancy-induced nausea
+3 (Strong Evidence)
Motion Sickness
+2 (Moderate Evidence)

PRO

  • Ginger significantly and consistently improves pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting when compared to a placebo.
  • Ginger poses no apparent risk to the pregnancy or fetus.
  • Ginger has a low incidence of side effects, especially when compared to other medications used for nausea, most of which, typically, cause sedation.

CON

  • The use of ginger for postoperative nausea and vomiting has yielded mixed results. Some well designed trials showed a positive effect but others did not.
  • There are not a lot of cons to using this product.

* *ADVISORY* *
Ginger has been shown to affect blood clotting. It should be used with caution in people who are taking medications that also affect clotting. Discuss its use with your doctor.

DOSAGE:For nausea and vomiting associated with pregnancy, take 250 mg four times daily as needed. To prevent motion sickness, take one gram one hour prior to the activity and then 250 mg four times daily as needed. To prevent post-surgical nausea and vomiting, take one gram one hour prior to the procedure with your doctor’s permission.

CONCLUSION:We conclude that ginger is a safe and effective product for the treatment of pregnancy-induced nausea, vomiting and motion sickness. The results for post-operative nausea and vomiting are less clear. All in all, its low incidence of side effects makes it a very attractive alternative to conventional medications. If you elect to try it, remember to include it in your list of medications when you visit your doctor and other health care providers.

REFERENCES
“Ginger.” Natural Standard –The Authority on Integrative Medicine. Natural Standard, 2013.
“Ginger.” Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. Therapeutic Research Faculty, 2013. 8 November 2013.
Elkady, A. et al. Differential Control of Growth, Apoptotic Activity, and Gene Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells by Extracts Derived from Medicinal Herbs Zingiber officinale. Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology (2012) 1-14
Morrison, P. et al. Do angry women choose alcohol? Addictive Behaviors 37 (2012) 908-913
Mansour, M. et al. Ginger consumption enhances the thermic effect of food and promotes feelings of satiety without affecting metabolic and hormonal parameters in overweight men: A pilot study. Metabolism Clinical and Experimental 61 (2012) 1347-1352
Hsiang, C. et al. Ginger extract and zingerone ameliorated trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis in mice via modulation of nuclear factor-jB activity and interleukin-1b signalling pathway. Food Chemistry 136 (2013) 170-177


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